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eAAqO【n t\【h【is wee】k’s Smart】 Regio【ns, we take a pl/unge i/n the European U/nion’s】 longest r\iver: the Danube. Since ancient【 ti】mes, the riverbed has see\n m】any chan【ges but some of its inhab【itants are in d/\anger. The Europ【ean Cohes/ion Polic\y //is providing a push to protect \the ri】ve\r’s ecosy【stem.The Danube is the second lo\ngest river in 】【Eu\ro【pe. \Its path 】can be t】ra\ced from\ Germany t/o the Black Sea. L\oved by many, the D/anube’s critical ecosystems a/re now being】 prote【cte【d and/ preserv\ed. Georg Frank】 is\ a biologist and coo】rdi/nator\ at the DANUBEPARKS network, an organ【isati\on \that p\rotects are】as】 around【 the ten count/ries crossed by t】he/ river.&ldqu/】【o;We have 【more than 900 islan【ds 【a\long t/he Danube […] of wh【ich【 147 islands which are absolutely natural and, in the 】frame of\ t】his /wild isl\and 【initiative, w】/e try to protect】 】- in particular 】/- these //【wild island/s covering se/veral /10,000 hectares."The Danube Park\s network is wo\rking to pre】ser】ve the\ basin of the 2885km river: 5,】00】0 animal species/ 】and 2000【 plants live alo】ng its shores./ /It has a budge/【t of 3 million eu【ros,/ of \which 2.【6 m/illion euros is covered by the E】U/'s Coh】esion P/olic\y.T\【he DANU/BEPARKS rep】resen【tatives pay particular attention to, what they c/all, fla【gship spe\cies. By preserving their habitat, they also prote/ct th【【e animals or 【plants l【iving there./Twenty years of work/ h\ave shown prom【ising re/sults in the res【toration of nat【ural environments. Euronews spok【e to【 Attila Fer/sch (the deputy】】 d\ire/ctor of th/【\e Fertö/;-Hanság/ national 】/park) about the result/s.“7/0-75% in the/ Hungarian Dan】ube b】io】tops/, D【anube habi【【tats, which were【 involved in this pr【oject are i】n good status. Probab\ly the】 other 25% of\ the D/anub/】e habitats are no】t critical, but】】 we【 hav/e to work 【【together".1212121212121】2Share this /articleCopy/paste the article /【video 【embed link be\low:CopyShar\eTwe】etSharesen【d\ShareTwee【】【tSha\/resendM】oreHideShareSendSh【areShareShareSendSha\reShareMore aboutEnvironmental pro】tectionFaun/a and FloraAustria / Brow/s\e today's\ tagsFyuA

U6G6O【n t\【h【is wee】k’s Smart】 Regio【ns, we take a pl/unge i/n the European U/nion’s】 longest r\iver: the Danube. Since ancient【 ti】mes, the riverbed has see\n m】any chan【ges but some of its inhab【itants are in d/\anger. The Europ【ean Cohes/ion Polic\y //is providing a push to protect \the ri】ve\r’s ecosy【stem.The Danube is the second lo\ngest river in 】【Eu\ro【pe. \Its path 】can be t】ra\ced from\ Germany t/o the Black Sea. L\oved by many, the D/anube’s critical ecosystems a/re now being】 prote【cte【d and/ preserv\ed. Georg Frank】 is\ a biologist and coo】rdi/nator\ at the DANUBEPARKS network, an organ【isati\on \that p\rotects are】as】 around【 the ten count/ries crossed by t】he/ river.&ldqu/】【o;We have 【more than 900 islan【ds 【a\long t/he Danube […] of wh【ich【 147 islands which are absolutely natural and, in the 】frame of\ t】his /wild isl\and 【initiative, w】/e try to protect】 】- in particular 】/- these //【wild island/s covering se/veral /10,000 hectares."The Danube Park\s network is wo\rking to pre】ser】ve the\ basin of the 2885km river: 5,】00】0 animal species/ 】and 2000【 plants live alo】ng its shores./ /It has a budge/【t of 3 million eu【ros,/ of \which 2.【6 m/illion euros is covered by the E】U/'s Coh】esion P/olic\y.T\【he DANU/BEPARKS rep】resen【tatives pay particular attention to, what they c/all, fla【gship spe\cies. By preserving their habitat, they also prote/ct th【【e animals or 【plants l【iving there./Twenty years of work/ h\ave shown prom【ising re/sults in the res【toration of nat【ural environments. Euronews spok【e to【 Attila Fer/sch (the deputy】】 d\ire/ctor of th/【\e Fertö/;-Hanság/ national 】/park) about the result/s.“7/0-75% in the/ Hungarian Dan】ube b】io】tops/, D【anube habi【【tats, which were【 involved in this pr【oject are i】n good status. Probab\ly the】 other 25% of\ the D/anub/】e habitats are no】t critical, but】】 we【 hav/e to work 【【together".1212121212121】2Share this /articleCopy/paste the article /【video 【embed link be\low:CopyShar\eTwe】etSharesen【d\ShareTwee【】【tSha\/resendM】oreHideShareSendSh【areShareShareSendSha\reShareMore aboutEnvironmental pro】tectionFaun/a and FloraAustria / Brow/s\e today's\ tagsOmCU5CND

HhhEText 【size/A【aAaYou can d/ocument i】t, just like \ten/s of】 thousands of citizens around t】he worl】d /joi/ned \【\】forc\es for thr】ee d】ays to do so.In 2016【 the Nat\/ural History Museum/ of Lo【s/ Angeles County and California\ Academy of Sci/ence/s started a competition between the tw\o\ citi】es. The g/oal was to in\volve citi\zens in documen\ting nature to hel】p them understa\n】d the urban bi\odiversity】 around them. T\he friendly rival【ry between Los An【geles and San Fran】】cisco enc/ouraged a lot of people to compete and use thei/r c【am【【era and smartphone to\ ma】ke wildlife /obse/rvations.The City Nature Challenge became nationa】l by/ 2017 and internati】onal by 2018. La/st year nearl】y 70 c【ities around the wor【\ld were 【taking part in the com\petiti【on. With 17,000 p】eople partic【ipatin/g, /m/o】re than 441,000】 ob\servations were 】made and 8,600 species were captured. Of these pictured【 spec】ies, 599 of them we/r\/e rare, endangered and th/reatened. Th【/is year】, /the【/ Ci【ty Nature \Challenge got 【more\ than 150 c【ities involved.Click on th】e video above to】 l/earn\/【 more about t/】his year【's chal】lenge and o\ne/【 of the\ cities with the highest contribu\tion.】S】ha/r【e this artic\le】 / M\ore from placesAuU3

oUWtG\r【eece \told to �/39;save your 【paradi\se as oi】l \compa【n【ies move in569k

VUKQText sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from life01wo

T/ake a\】 l【ook 】at】【 the plastics o/f the f/uture

EYijHow to become a 【】more sustain\able\ me【at eaterBWMs

dUXDText sizeAaAaMagda【le\na【 Herrera, director of pho】\tog/raphy at】 G/EO】 magazine, has a 【weal】th of exper【ienc【e in t\【he wor\ld o\/f photography and journalism, an/d a keen eye for an am【\azin\g image. /This made h/e/r id【eally place【d for her a【ppoin/tment as a judge for】\ th【e 2019 Eu\r【op】ean Wildlife Photographer o】f the Y\ear】./The competition, run annually b\y the So】ciety of German Nature Photographers and now\】 in its 19th year, challenges profession\al and no/n【-professional photo【graphers】 alike to 【provide th】e bes/t photograp/hy Europe has to offer/.Herrera too【k/ some time【 to talk t\o us ab】out the com/petition, what to exp】ec/t,【 and how photographers, a【s well as providin\g b\reathta【【kin【g image\s,】 can help drive positive engage\ment w//【ith t\he envir】onment.【Congratu\/lation】s on your ap【po】intment\ to t\he judging pa\nel for the GDT European Nature photographer of t】he Year 2019. How did you beco】me involved wit【h th】】is 【\co\mpe】tition】?&ldqu\o;I t】】hin/k some of the p】hotographers I wo/r/k\ with\ at Geo ha/ve】 s【uggest【ed that I partic】ipa】te. Geo is a magazine that 【is concer】ned with the 【en/vir/onment, nature /a【nd\ wildlife con【serva\tion.&rdquo\;Salvad】or Colvee【, Nebot Der/ Tanz 】D【es Okt【o【pus】W】hy 】do 】yo\u thin/k competitions such/ as this a\re i】mportant?“N】/【a】tu\re a】nd wildlife ph【otography is becoming increasingly po\pular. P【ho【tographers 【are our am/bassador\s an\d our eyes an\d these e】vents allow u】s 【to make the object of t【heir w/o/rk known/ to the widest possible 【au\dience. Tod/ay, it i】s/ important to highligh【t the natural beauty o/f o【ur pl/anet but /also t】/he dang\ers. /It/'s not just about beautifu\l p\ic/【ture】s.”H】ave you seen /many of the entries 】yet? What i/s the standard lik】e so far?“As far as I【 can se】e the standard is high!”Is】 there an【ything in particular you’】r【e hoping to s/ee in this year’s 【entri/es?“I hope /】to see, as wit\h any photo, something that sho/ws com/plexity or tension, behaviour, activity a\nd threat too.&rdqu/o;Is there a cat【egory that you particula\rly appreciat\e or enjoy?“I have to say, I love all of the】m\ \but I am 】part【icularly intere】sted in the 】K7 \one (the one that focuses o】n the beneficial or】 n【\egative rel【ationsh】ip /bet【ween humans /and nature).【Cristobal【 Serran\o, Der PoolWhy do/ you /th【i/nk it is \important 】for the competition to exp【lore this particul【ar topic?“It is important not t【o separate /the animal fro\m the human and to sh/ow th【【is relations】hi】p, which\ can /be de】structive (o\n\ the part of humans). W【e share a p【lanet where everyone must find t【heir 【place.&rdqu【o;To what ex/tent is nature photo\graphy a\ble to re/flect on the【 efforts of c\onservation 】a】nd/or reveal\ what/ more nee【ds to be done?】 Wha/t【 are its limi\ta】tions?“Nature photogr\ap/hy sho/ws us 【an ov【e】rview of the situati【on, s】/ometimes in a very aesthetic form, but in recent【 years/ it has evolved 【into\ a photography t\hat r/evea】ls【 a context \that, 【like any】 documen/tary photography, explores th】e re/lations/hip of the living to a territ//ory. In this se】nse/, it s】trongly【 concerns us all.”/W/ords: Dan【ny \McCanceHeader: Joel Brunet, Ein /Gemaelde d【es LebensShare this artic\le 【 More fr【om placespRg3

MdNrTe】xt sizeAaAaIn th\e shadow of \t【he f】irst/ a】nnive】rsary of/ jo【urnalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 】murder an\d\ amid escalating tensions in neighbouring Yemen, Saudi Arabi\a has opened its /doors to tourism for 】the first time.The/ fac】t is,/ Saudi has been cut off from many West\erners until】/ no【w. A\ poor i【mage in the press, alon【\gside al】legations of human 】rights abuses have put some off the idea. /That’\s \not to mentio\n 】【【the dif【ficulties in getti\n】g a vi/sa】.Now, however/, the obstacle of the 】vis/a ha\s been /removed, after 【Saudi 【/announ/ce】d its new t】ourism scheme in Septembe\r. The new tourist v】isa【 allows visi/tors from 49 countries – includin\g 】all EU n/ations i】n 【addition 】to the US/, Canada, China, Japa【n】 and 】Rus【sia among other【s】 – t\o pay \on arrival for a 90-day tourism visa/.\ It comes at a cost of 440/ S【AR plus VAT, equivalent to £9/&eu/ro;106/【9.Saudi is turning t\\o tourism in place of oilEu\ronews / \Rachel Gr\ahamThe 】】tourism board hopes the n\e【w v【isa will make it easier for people \to\ discover the land for themselv/es. And it&rsquo【;【s fair to sa\y there /is much m】ore to/ 】discover than \many realise.Read mo\re |【An unfilt【ered【 g【uid】e to getti【ng a/round in】 Saudi A【rabiaMuch of Saudi Arabia/ /wa/s un】der【wa【ter 】mil\lions of 【years a【go, and it s】h/ows\ in the landscape wit/h r/ocks ju】tting out ac【ross th】e dese【【\rt, forming wha\t used to be shelv】【es and cor】al 【reefs. Meanw】hile, the Red Sea coast as it is now is 】\a sight simil/ar to that of the Maldives. There are more than\ /1,100 tin/y, and\ com【p】letely undevelope】d, 】【/is【\lands that】 【】are home /to w【onders【 of【 n/ature.Madein Saleh, near Al UlaEuronews / R】a【chel GrahamThe western coastline fe【ature\s 】】island】s reminiscent of the Mal/divesEuronews / Rachel【\ G】rahamBut for Westerners to unco/ver th\e s\ights and sounds of 】Sa/udi, t】】】hey&r【squo;d have to be convinced that either their negat\ive percept】ions have been ex】a//ggerated or that the country has changed. \So, how liberal【 is Sau【di Arab【ia a【】bout【 to /become in its bid 【】to e【nchant\】 /tourists? A\nd at what co/st?Crown Prince Mohammed B】in S\alman is\ 】said to be behind the drive /f/or Saudi to ditc】h【 its reliance o/【n oil,\ /an】d move tow\ards other form】s of】 in/com/e. A shining jewel of that 【plan is for Saudi Arabia/ /to/ be/come【 a hub for internatio/\nal tou\rism.Supe】r citi【esIt 【has【 experience of tourism as the site \of 【the world&rsq【uo;s\ largest/ pilgrimage si\te at Mec/ca, seeing nearly 1.9 million】 non-Saudi Musli/ms make the Hajj\ pil】grimage over /the course of just a few days la【st yea【r. But no【w, the coun\tr】y】 is gearing up\/ to position i/t【self as a \luxury destination】.It is spending hundreds of/ billio】n【s【 \on \new i/n\frastruc【ture and a trio of gig【aprojects th/ro\u【ghout\ the country to \m】ake it more appealing/ to disc\erning visitors.\ These 】audacious pl/ans include 】building Saudi Arabia’s fir】st ski slop/e ins【i\de Riyadh】&rsq\u】o;s upcoming Mall Of 【Arabi\a shop\ping 】cent/re, 】\and creating the Neom super cit【y on Saudi’s Re【d Se\a coast.What wil\l \soon b】e Neom is \cur\ren\tly part of 【an/ 800km stretch of coastline s\outh /】o【f t】he bord】er with/ Jordan. A\】s it stands,\ it /doesn’\t ye【t feature a single fiv】e】-star hotel or r/es/o】rt.M/ultiple so/urc】es \\t【old Euronews Living th\at the Saudi go】v】ern/ment】 was in “advanced talks&rdq\uo; /to allow】 alcohol in /the country, 】nea/ring\ the /stage of being “rea】dy to sign” agre】ements /permitting alco】】hol in resorts such as N【eom. Currently possessi\on of or trade in alcohol is prohibi/ted, /】leading to 【se\v】ere punishments including imprisonment fo\r those cau/g\ht flouting the rules【.Shou/ld thos【e new】 r\egu/lat】【i】o\ns com】e to fruition, bo\oze wil【l become jus】t a\ small pa/rt o】【f the attract】io】n.The gove\r/【n/ment has said it is c\omm】itted t/o maintaining S/audi&rsquo】/;【s \uniqu【e s【/el\ling point\【, which bring//s together landscapes like t\hose of the U/S’s grand canyon】, the Maldives&rsquo/;/ seas and 】ancient c】ultural attra/ctions. T/his\ 【would mean sustainable】 tou\rism manag【\ement and premium positioning, sa】/y offic【ials.Al Ul】a is set to become 'th\e world's biggest liv\ing mus】eum'Euronews /【 Rachel GrahamS】ustainability/“Once we identify an e/nvironme】nt, we pu/t a coastal management plan into place,&rd【quo; s【ays Captain 】Ahmed/【 Shaker, associate director of the Marina &【amp; Yac】ht Club at King Abdul/lah Economic Centr/e north of Jeddah.“So if we】 \find a be】/ach //w\here turt/les nest, it&】rsquo/;ll be/ of\f-limits except to very small【 n\umbers of conserv【ationist\s and eco-tourists w\ho’ll access the】m in a way that doesn’t distu【rb the wildlife. We’re e】xpecting sport fishing to becom//e a big\ part of the tourism push, and【 there i/t will b】e all about catc\h and r/elease.&rdquo】;Saudi Arabia plans to【 a/ttra\ct tour】\ists to th\【e Jedd】ah coastline for /sp/ort fi】shing \【and divingKAECAmaala is a zero carbon/ resort coming to Saudi A【r】abi\a's /west coastAmaalaShaker i/s passionate abo【ut p/reser【vin/g /\the ocean/s \surrounding hi【s home【land. “/Working】 a】s a scuba instructor in Sharm El Sh】e/ikh in th】e late 80s, I saw th/e transformatio【n a\s it became a dest/ination】 【for mass tour/ism and watched as the co】rals got so rui】ned, it wa\s h】ard】ly/ w/orth diving anymo\r\e. That’\s when 】\it b/ecame a nightlife resort instead, be【cau【se 【the n】atu【ral be/auty was gone】.”Inla\nd, a project【 named 【Amaala is ai/ming for a carbon n\eutra\l buil【d/ and final【 result. It is set to feature a 【mar】ine conservation/ \ce/ntre and state of/ the art h】ea/th facil【ities in addition to luxury, sol/a】r-powered ho/tels.R/ead more | How do you make/ 】a /】luxury tourist【 destin\ation zero carbon?T【he kind of pers【\o】n likely to /make use of these /facilities are advent】urers 】- those 【\a/ttracted by t\he culture and unknown qua】ntity t\hat makes Saudi Ar【abi【a a mysterious destination, says UK based tou\/rism co【【nsultant /Roger Goodacre.\The\ coast】al region of Tabu】k is set to b【ecome encom】passed by NeomEuronews / Rachel Graham"/Saudi 】is hardly i/n danger of be\coming a mass/ tourism destination," he says. "It's someon/e who wa【nts to explor【e【【 things they\【 haven't b\een able\ to before who will visit, and there 】will be some drawn by the/ Red Sea】 Coa\st. It's p】erhaps /【the 【last unspoiled di/ving d【estination of its kind on Ear\th."Cur【rently, he's working on a project to 】quadrupl【e the n【umber of pilgrims visiting Mecca \each year, /but sees n/o object to non-Musli\ms enj】oying\ it. "Most 】people don't let their political views】 colo\ur t】heir choi】ce of holiday destinations."/How Western】 wi\ll Saudi/ go?Tac\o Bell res\】taurants, Domino's 【pizza jo【in【ts, Dunkin' \Donu\ts coffee shops a】lr【eady \line/ the /streets【 o】f Riyadh/, provin】g the Saudi p\eople /have】 already develo\ped quite/ a taste for some Western \s\t\aple】s.Meanwhil】e/, liberalisation is well underw【/ay, according to Good】acre. "Th\e religi\ou/s police [the mutaween] d【on't have anywhere【 near as much po/w】er as they \used 【to," he】 tells 】】Euronews Living."S/ocially, it\'s consid/erably more relaxe】d now, es【pecially in Jeddah【 where you're less likel\y】 to see he/a【d 【coverings, a/nd more likely to see w】om】e/n【 driving, cycling】 a/long the prome【nades and mixing of\ sexes. I【t wou\ld all have been \unthinka】ble/ until r】ecently."Read mo/re |\Trio of \eco hotels to open/ n/ext doo/r t】o 【UN【E\SCO World Heritag】e siteThe r】e【pressive】 stat\e that 【many envision is/ open【 to further cha/nge, add】】s Ahmad A\l-Khateeb, c【ha】ir\man 【of the】 Saudi Commission for Tourism and Natio\nal Heritage.“Once you o/pen the doors, it’s ve\ry difficult【 to close \them 【once more,” he says. 】After all,【 the commission w/ant \visitors to be “surprise】d and【 delighted by the trea\【sures we hav\e to sha/re&rdq/u\o;. H】e counts among them\ “five UNESCO /World Heritage S/ites,\ a vibr/ant/ local cu】lt\ure and bre】athtaking natural beauty&\rdquo;.Ar/chi【tecture in t/he capital is 【thor/oughly mod【ern\/Amr AlMadani, CEO of /the【 Royal Com\missi/on fo【r AlUla, stresses that you h【ave to have 【li【v/\ed in Saudi Arabia long e\nough to see t/he change, but po】【ints \to lifting the【 】ban on【 w【omen driving l/ast year as a pivot】al moment.Now, he wan//ts 】to mak/e AlUla - \which form\ed t】he s/o/uth\er【n h/ub \of the ancient\ Nabatean civilisation - t【he “large【st living mu】seum in the world&【rdquo;. Opening to tourism for th【em【 means revealing【 a place th\【/at connects humans, culture and 】nature."We think of AlUla as \Petra plus," he sa/ys, referring to the】 Nab/atean c\api】tal region in Jord/an 【that has become a hub f】or hist【\ory b/uffs and tourists.And 【\th【e question of the coveri\ng u/p? It is per】】haps /one of\ th【e first images【 conjured for man】y when think of Saudi Ar【abia. However wearing the \abaya isn't manda\tory for f\oreign【 visitors【, says AlMadani. "But the type of tourist we're exp】ect/ing to attract is respectful of the cul】】/ture.&rd\quo;Ultimately, \opening the floodgates to tourism wh\ile maint【】ai【ni】ng/ respect 】for Saudi&r\squo;s cul/tural heritage and natu【ral env【ironment may be to】ugh. But it is the challenge its government ha【s chos/en. With their confidence 【bol\stered by the pre\mium p/rice po【int an/d curren】t【 dear【th of wat/ering holes likely to s\c【are /of/f bargain hunters, they【 may yet succeed\.【Madein Saleh, 【near Al UlaEuronews / Rachel Graha/mShare【 】this a\rticle 【【 More from placesAx25

rnvISea/ life at 】risk if EU count】ries don't a【chieve/ marine protection 【goa\lsFIWt

Hf2s/Join us in t\his i\mmersive 36/0° experience onboard "/B】roodw/inner" - a /29 metre bea/m trawler built// in【 1967 a/nd used to train/ you】ng fisherme【n in Belgium.The vessel, renova【\ted a 【f【ew years ago with the supp】ort of the Euro】pea/n 】Maritime and 【Fis/heries F/und, has everything necessary to p】/rovide fut/ure maritime professiona【l】s\ with ha/】nds-on ex】perience./B】art De Waegenare, a te【acher a\t the Maritie【m Instituut Merca/tor in 【Ostend, \superv\is\es a】 group of l】o\】cal students on/ their training trip."T/he】【y】 come f/rom everywh】】ere in Belgium. /They start at 12-13 years of age, and they sta/y u/ntil 18."The f\irst and the second year clas【ses 【go to】 sea /ev】ery】 \n\ow 【and【 then, but the th】ird and /fourth】 year students go out e/very two week】\/s with t】he vessel — eve【r【y tw【o wee/ks for 【a whole s\chool year."That’s normal\ working hours, between 080/0 and 1600 &m\dash; so/ fo\r 】eight hours a day/, t\hey are at /sea."We /try to t/each them /to be a fis/herma】n — fr】om t\he begi\nning. What is a fis【hing boat, what d】o you/ have to do,/ it’s normal working cond【iti【ons f【/【or a beam trawler【."We teach them t\o work safe\ly】 【— safet\y he】lmet, saf【ety】 device for 】when/ 【they fal】l overboard — that&rsquo】;s never happened, but【 you never know【. So that&r/squo;s also an importan\t part. Working w【ith fish /— 【they have to clean the 【\fish, things 】lik【e that. And /naviga】ting th/e/ vessel also."They really see what it is\, getting their first impression \her\e.\ A/nd then when they get older, they g】et technical cl】a/sses, and t】he older g】u】【\】/ys /\h\ere go to sea on professional fishing vessel\s. There they see real life at a workplace. A】nd that,\ in \my opi\nion\, i\s when they /make/ a choice to do \it — o】r not to d\o it."Journalist name • Denis】 LoctierSh\are this articl【eShareTweetSharesend】/ShareTweetShar【esendMoreHide/ShareSendShareShareSha【reSendSh/areShare\More \aboutOceanFisheryEnvironmental protectionYouth360° vid\eo 】 【 【】 Most viewed / \ /What influence on clim/a【te/ is th\e coronavirus lockdown really having? / 【 / T\【he new AI system 【safeguarding pre/mature babies from infec\tion / \ \ 】 【 / 】 Messenger R\NA:【 \the molecule\ that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 】 / Apple and Google\ say they'll wo/rk toget【her t】o trace spread of coronavirus via smartphon】es \ 【 【 】 \ How EU funding is \chan\ging th【e fac【e of L\a/】tvian\ innovat】ion 【 / \ 【 Browse today's t/【ag/sbpAf

j8Jy【Szi】get m】us\ic fe【【st】ival in Hungary/ sh】owcases its gre】en /c/\redentials0QSm

TF44【9;M/onster fa】tberg',\ bi【gger than the 【Tower of Pis】a, discov/【ered in D】evon /dWZu

kucP\The sout\h-west Africa】n /country of An/gola is wakin】g up to /its\ tour/ism potenti/al, offering opportunitie/s for vi【sitor【\s and /in【vestor\s a【lik【e./One of the】 most unspo\ilt regions\ is th】e Namibe deser/t, wh/ich/\ stretches 2,000 kil【ometr】es acr【o\ss t】hree countri【es.T【he dese\rt runs all 】the way from t/he/ Iona Nation\al Park in A】\ngola, t】hrough/【 Namib【【ia, to South Af\ric\a&r】squo;s 】Kalahari Desert - more 【than 80,000】 square kilometres. You \can\ drive for hour/s along the Corridor of the Tides, where the desert meets the ocean.N】a/m\ib】e mean】s ‘’vast pla\ce’&rsquo【;\ in the local la\ng/uage and it lives up【 to its name &/nd【ash; a tourism wonderl【and with a s\p\ect】acula\r coastlin【e.A\ndrea\ Mar【tins【【 runs an eco-touris】m lodge perched abo【ve a 】grotto on the Atlantic Oc】ean. Praia do \Soba, meaning &lsqu\o;Beach of the Chief’, offe【/rs mag【/nificent view【s of sandstone \cliff/s c】/arve\d by na【ture.【Mar】ti【ns says】 the locatio【n was dis/cov\ered by her f\ather and\ the【 family/ decided to inv】est there.She comp】/a\r/es her adventuro/us fat\her to the movie character Crocodile Dundee.“This wa\s the\ l】a】/st lost paradise of】 Angola】, beca】use no one fo/und this 【plac【e, becau\s【e there was】\ no road, /no/ access, and my Crocodile 【Dundee, m【y father, the/ Ango】lan Crocod/ile Du】】ndee, arr\ived here, he m【ade】 a road, an】d he found this amazi】ng place.&rdq】uo/;The ind】i】vidual hut【s are //beautif【ully decorated, and there are plans to build more. The/re are also plans to provide luxury campsites for so-cal】led glam/ping tourism.Marti【ns tol【d Business Angola: “W\e 】want t/o make a bigger r】e/staurant, a conference room,/ more rooms and we want to (【do) glamping, to have【 al【l kinds of people here.&rd\/quo;Martin Bremer, a S/out/h African businessman, already ru】】/ns】 a g】lamping compa【【ny, giving tourists 【a/ chance to t【ravel dee【【p into the heart of Nami】be\ pro/vi【nce.Bremer\ has travelle】d extensiv】ely th【rough southern Africa as part\ of his stone business.&】ldq/uo;We visited all sorts of &l【squo\;off the beaten track’ (places), a】ll the uncha\rted sites. And i】t was just a\ n/a\/tural thi\ng to do to bring p【eople into this area./”Bremer/ says co【mp\ared to /other countri【es in southe/rn Africa, An【gola is ripe for investm】ent in tourism.&l【dquo;It【's op】e\n, 】it's becoming much easier to for【m partnerships. They】've changed m\any of the la\【ws to make it ea【sier for /people t\o invest. There ar/e great c【ompan/ies in Angola.”It&rsquo/\;s hope/d【 a/ 500 mi【l/l【ion-euro expansion of the southe\rn port of Namibe\ w】ill have flow-on eff【/ects for t/ourism a】nd \leisure.Japanese company Toyota is be【hi\nd the investment, wh\ich will 】doub\le the size /of the】【 po】rt, connect\ed to the region by rail, while adding tou\rism and lei/sure facilities.Nuno Borges da Silva, \Chairman of \Toyo\ta Angola, told Business An【gol\a: “The port will /be a big support fo【r tourism/ ves【se\ls】, because】【 now they 】don't hav】e conditions/ to 【bring vessels and tour【i【sts. But w/hen this p【ort【 is ready it wil/l be very beautif/ul, and y/ou can al\so d【oc】k b】ig vessels.&r】【dq】/uo;【He said for【eigners can invest \in An\gola without any local/ partners.&ld【quo;Let'】s say it's more open to the peop【le to come and \invest w【ithout any difficulty, a\ny problem,【” he said.【Sha【re this articleC【/opy/pas\te the/ article video embed link be/low:CopyShareTweetShar\esendShareTweetSharesendMor【e【Hide\Share【SendS【】hareShar/eShareSen】\dSh【/a】reSh\ar\e【More aboutTouri/smFauna and】 Fl/oraEnvironment\al prot】ectionAn\golaAfrica Bro【wse today�】【;s /t【ag】scZiJ

fAchText s\izeAaAaAlt】hough he wa\s only born in 1984, Hung/arian G\&a//acut\e;bor M【iklós Szőke is\ al【ready a promi/】nent artist of the contempor【ary \sc【ulpture scene in Budapest/\. His main a【rtwor\k/s are public an/imal】 /sculp\tures, \noticeable for】 their “lath-style” and enor/mous si/ze. He prefers to\ work with stainless steel an/d hardwood 】ra】th/er /than traditional marble and bro【nze to give/ his art a more "mo】dern aesthetic"\.The A】tlanta Falcons recently c/ommis】sioned/ the arti\st t/o erect a giant falcon 【statu【/e in time for【 the open/ing】 of【 their n【ew Mer【cedes-Benz Stadi/\u【/m. /With a wingspan of\ /21 meters\ and a heig/ht/ of 13/ meters\, 【the mas】sive stai\nless steel sculpture \【is now the largest bird re/presen/tation in the worl【d. “Calo\/ssus” in Samo【rin \is the larges\t equine st】atue】 in \Europ【e. Other sculptures\ 】by G【ábor can be found arou/nd the world fro】\/m 】Gstaad\ to \Bahrain, 】Washi】ng\ton\ D.C. \to Niz【h/ny Novgorod. View/ this post on In】stagramMa 4 é【ve avat【tuk sz&ia/cute;vemhez egyik legközelebb álló szobromat, a 】Frad\i sa\st, Európa le【gnagyo【bb á】l】l/and&\oacute; k&o/】uml;ztéri mad&aa】cu\te;rszobr&aa】\/cute;t, am/elyet a vilá】\gon sz/in【te mindenhol】 ismernek. A】z a szeretet és b&uum/l;szkeség, amit szobromo\n \keresztül a\z&oacu【te;ta is k/apok nap, mint n\ap, felbecsülhetetle\n, 】e】zúttal kösz&】ouml;】nöm! Hajrá F【radi! ?【???【 #ftc #eag】le #hajrafra/di #gaborms【zoke 】#bud】apest #hung/aryA post shar【ed by Gabor Miklos Szoke, Art\ist (@gab/ormszoke) o\n Aug 9, 2018 at 4:25am PDTIt’s 】【not a surprise /H\ungar\/ian 【media call\】 him “H/un/gary/&rs/quo;s \coolest export” a\nd that he made it into Hungarian Fo\rbes】 Magazin】e&rs】quo;s “【T/op 10 under\/ 30&rdq\uo/; in 2015, or t/hat he has received】 numerous national and international aw【ard【s. Despit】e all the 【success at suc\h a young age, G【&aacu【te;bor never 】/forg\et【s that his sculptu/res are not just about inst【antl/y recogniz\abl】】e 】shape】s and shee\r magnitud/e. View 【this post on InstagramRise Up! /T\his mott【o【 can\ best /desc/ri/be】\ m【y sculpture\, the A/tlanta Falcon! S/he is proud, f】ree \and authoritative at the\】 same time.】 \I c】a】n't wai/t/ t【o see her again! 】???? @mercedesbenzstadium #amb】se #mbs\art #merc【edesbenzstadium #atla【ntaga/ #sbliii #【atlan】t/afalcon #touchd/own #momen【t\ #riseup #publicsculpt】ure #】arr【 #desi\gn #co【ntempor/arya/rt #gabormszok】e #\【atlantafal】con/ #at】lantafal\cons #superbowl #【superbowl【53 #sbliii #a【tlantaA post shar/ed by Gabor Miklos Szoke, Art\i】st (@gaborm【szok/e\) o】n Jan 28,】 2019 \at 8\:03am PST【We sat d/ow\n with him and Berta Hauer, his\ man\ag【er and partner, /in】 their i【mpr【essive stu/dio locate】d \in/sid\e an 【】abandoned/ /f【actory in the/ south o/f Budapest, wh\ich won the d\esign of【fice of th】e year award in Hun】gary /i\n 2016,【 t【o \ask what's the message be】hind/ his ar\t. View th【is post 】on InstagramDante Imperium Part】y in the G【abor\【 M. Szok【【e Studio ????/???】???? #】dant【eimperiu\mbrut #prenyeparty #welcometom【yworld #industria】】lparty #【gabormszoke #studiolife #sex【 #danteem】pire w】\ith @b\ertaha/uer ❤ʊ【39; 】phot/o by @gregusmateA pos/t 】/shared by 】Gabor Miklos Szoke, Arti\st (@gaborm】/szoke/) on Jan 5, 2018 】at 2\:05pm PST/When did your interest 【\/in art and sculp/ture begin?"I’ve been 【i【nvolved in crafts\ since child【hood. I a【lways drew /a l】ot and made little sculp/tu/res】. Twelve /years ag【o, I w\as a/t an art 【retr】eat wi】th\ my】\ univer】sity class\ma\tes and it \was there that I fi\rst/】 gathered w\ood planks/ and stic【ks\, a/nd rea\/liz\ed/ that it could 【actually be a pretty cool\ mean of artistic expression. It&rsq/uo;s almos】t like drawing thin【gs in spac/e【 whilst【 enablin】g you to 【mak【e massive art pieces. I quickly realized/ that this would b/e something big beca】u/se on the way back fro/m the art retreat I put the makeshift sc\ulp\ture\ 】【on top o】\f m【y car and【 /ever/yone was taking photos as I was driving【 away. So I decided to 】pursue t\his \style to make a bigger impression with my sculptu/res. It’s also a way of keeping things fr】o【m th/e past/ an\d /givin\g the【】\m a new exist\ence."What are the sustain\able methods /】a】nd p【ractices yo】u empl【oy\ in 【your a】rt?"My w\hole ar【tistic motto is /giv】ing old things new meanings, kind of 】lik】/e w【ith my stu\dio. Back in its glory days, the Manfr&e\acut】e;d Weiss Steel \and Metal Works he】re in Cse【pel【 was t【he second biggest in Europe. I’m r/eally inspired by old thin\gs because d【espit/e their age/, they tend 【to be】 mu\ch s【turdier【 than】 new ones.""Whe/neve\r I ca】n, I\ create my art from reused materials, tar\ a【nd found objects. Ten years ago around Chri\s【tmas time 】I】 was lef\t with a \lot 】of wood 】that I wou\ldn’t/ n\eed【 in the coming ye】ar. S】】o, in/stead\ of throwing it 【al/l out, I made l/ittle Christmas tree sculpt【ures and sold【 them. Since then, it /has become a/ 】traditi】on and I always do this around Christmas 】ti\】me】. 【On】 the o【n/e h/and, /nothing gets thrown away \and on the other it saves thousands of 【pine t\rees bec/ause 【people\ who【 buy my “trees” won’t be buy/ing real one】s for ma】ny years to come." View 【/this p\ost on InstagramChristmas gift 【alert/: My new X【mas】/ trees are out, save a tree and buy some/ a【rt☝️more/ i\nfo】r\mation/ 【on the /web】site, \click \on BIO;\)/??A post s/hared by Gabor Miklos Szoke, Arti/st (【@gabormszoke)\ on Nov 16, 201】8 at 【7:25am P】ST"Enviro\nmental a】wareness in ge/neral is 【something\ that/【 is very 】important for Berta an】d m【【/yself. B】ack in 20/10, righ【t /a\fter fi\nishing my s【tudie/s, I represented Hungary at a/n/ 】international art\ comp】etition o\rganized by th\e【 Collegiu】m Hungaricum Vienna. The th\eme was the Dan】ube Ri/ver. Unfortunately, &ld】quo;civilization” ha\s dec/imated the once v/ibra\nt river an\d turne\d it i】nto an oily, contaminate【d smu/dg/e. In \the Danube River, the sturg】eon is on the brink of extinction. Th】ese f/i【sh are e【xtremely sensit/ive to】 environmental p【re】ssures, making the\m/ valuable indicators for healt【hy【 rivers. To\ emphasize how dire the situation \is, I ga【\thered pla\stics and debris f【rom the Dan【ube to create "The Last Stu/rgeon" piece. These m/at【eria【ls, the manner of\ formulation, the fish&r【】s【quo;s f【ractured ski/n – all this re/fers to】 its unnatural 】way of perishing an/d \calls 【on the viewer to take greater responsib/ilit【y/ for our h】【itherto ne\gligent attitudes towards the species t【hat sh【are t【his planet 】with us【.""T\he Last /St】urgeon" sculpture in【 ViennaSoc\ial \responsibility\ in general is of great importance to 【you. What ar】e some of the\ most press\ing cause/s fo】r you c】urrently? How do you address them in your a】rt and what else are you【 doing 【to fight for th\】em?"In 2014, 】I wa/s// as/ked to create a symbol for t】he Tollwood F】esti\val in Munich/. This festival is k】n】own fo】r its stance \on envi\ronmental and /ani/mal 】welfare issues. T\hat year the f【\ocus was】 on the \ter】rible conditions endured by fa/rm animals 】so I create】d the “【Sad P【ig”, a gi/ant p【i【g statue t】hat i】s】 far too】 big for the nar/row ste\el cage it is forced to live in. A】【t that ti/me, Munich【 had/ the/ hi【】ghest pork consump\tion in\ all of/【 Europe/ so I \wa\nte】d to r\aise awareness about the animals’ t/ragic fates.""Sa】d Pig"/ at\ Tollwo】od Festival/"Sa【d Pig\" at Tollwood Festival"Also, I try【 to 【do/ what I ca/n for disadva】nta】ged a\】n\d minority communities /here\ in Hungary.\ In【\ 2012 I】/ took part in【 the c】haritable Hello Wood】 art camp/. I d\ec\id/ed to create a tot\em animal in the /form of a “Guardian Tiger” for one of th/e】 poorest v/illages in/ th【【e country, where m】ost members belong to the Roma /mino\rity. The villa//ge endured many hardships and muc】h violence in the pa】st】 】but with the【/ arrival o【f this/ 【“guardian】”】 came media attention and with】 \t【hat, 】g\overnment funds to raise the\ standard of 【/living in this villa/【ge. Th【e villagers love this tiger, t\ake great care/】 【of it, and 】or】ganiz】e an an【nua/l "Tig\er Festi】val". Seeing all this positive \im\pac\】t was one of 【the/ most touchin【g m/oments for me. By do【ing good, good】 cam/e \back to me a】s well because it was this project /t】hat g/ot【 【me global media \attention.""The Guard】ian Tiger【" sculpture"Af】ter the “Guardian Tiger&r【dquo;, the authorities】 of similarly disadvan】taged/ 】lo】c【ales\ started to g/】et in touch with me to brighten up/ the lives of thei\r citizens 【through art【. In 20【13】,【 I installed a guardi/an unicorn in the f【orest near t】he Russian town】 of Vyksa\,/ known for being the largest manufacturer of steel welde\d pipes and railway wheels 【in Russia. The magical creatu】r【e rem/in\ds pe【opl【e that you can be an individual even in a glum, i\ndustrial town. A \si】milar colourful unicorn was create\d the same year in Kazi【ncbarcika, an i\ndu】strial tow\n in Hungary full of apartments' blocks. Lo/cals really【 l\o\ve this 【】unicorn and pla【nt pretty fl【owers on】 the roun\【dabout on which it&rs】quo;s l/ocate\d. I eve【n think that\ one year it won the country&rsq】uo/;s 'Prettiest Roundab\out' award!/""Rainbow Unico【r\n""\I find i/t ve\ry im\portant to improve the visual 】culture of kids so】 that the coming generations kno】\w/ how 】to app】reciate and preserve beauty】. Th【e Hungar】ian town of Érd commis\sioned /\me to bring【 life to local k\ind\ergarten building/s and I d【ecided to get t【he\ ch】ildren in】volv/ed【 by encouraging them to take part in the brainstorm【/in/g process. I 【as】ked them questions like\ what they dreamt of, what th【eir f/avorite】 animals were, et/c. and together we create\d friend】ly animals all around\ the kindergarte】ns./"The Kinder/gart】e】n Project/Eva Szombat"In general, I beli【eve the sculptures in pub/li【c spaces affect 】p/eople&rsqu【o;s l/【ives no matte/r wher【e they are. And 【】as【 for【 【my wo/r/ks, they a\re a【lways\ exactly】 whe【re \they ne】ed to 【be and t/hey always somehow refle/ct and connect to/ the place they are in."Ho/w, in your opinion, does art he】lp】 raise awareness about impor/ta\n\t\ issues\ like a】nimal welfare an/d climate/ ch】a\nge?"In t【erms /of PR and communications, you can do a lot of messagin】g. 【I/ cre】ated a rhino sculp/】ture 【\for the Budapest Zoo in 2013 and it’s a re【curring th\】eme for me. Every ye】ar\ I p/ost a ph】oto of it an/d rem】ind my\ fol】\low\ers/ that this year there are a lot/ fewe】r of t】hem l/ef【t in the wild than the year b/efore." 【View this post on I\nstagra/mVisitin/g Sanyika【 a【t th【e Bartha Factory ?/?@tomi.bartha #【Sa\nyika #Sa】nyib&aacut】e;csi #rhino #rhino/ceros #wild\life #be/echwood #\【sculpt】ure #bigb/oy #gabormiklosszoke #габ【086; 】88;l【4;&【#【1080;клошсё 】82;еA post shared by Gabor Miklos Szoke,\ Artist (@gabo【rmszoke) on Mar 3, 【2016 at 1:20】pm P\ST\"I try to stick /to the animal t】heme /not \only【 be/cause they&rsqu】o;re a cool s【hape【 but because there’s an【 underlying message/ I /【usually want to get across with eac】h work. Because t【he】y are mostly/ on display in public 【】spaces it helps reac/h al/l ag【e grou】ps and social backgrou/nd【s and \ref】lect on the role an】imals pla/y in our lives."Share this article More\ 【from l/ifePDmZ

lWyBText sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from lifeMqOG

WtkZ【The Green Revol【ution - fast【e【r, cheaper and more eff/icient teles\copic w/indt【urbines 【qju0

4wp7The world's highest/-op\erating\ weather st\ations have been installed on M\ount\ Everest, a【ccording to th】e Nation【al Geogr\aphi【c Society. The】y \were placed 】at 8,4/30\ metres and 7,945 metre【s as part \of a three-mon/th scien/tific】/ 【assessme\nt of\ the planet's t/allest peak.The expedition t】eam set o【ut to Everest to gain a deeper understanding of/ t】he/ 【effects of cli】mate change on t【he Kara【koram\ glacie\r/ r】【ange. Due to【 increasing global temp【eratu【res, t\hese glaciers have b【een rapidly disap】pearing, sa\y the scientists.【The/ geol】ogy team from Nat【ional Ge【【ographic【 and Rolex's【 Perp\etual Planet Extreme Expediti/onNATIONALGEOGRAPHIC/FREDDIEWILKINSONNATI/ONA/LGEOGRAP】HIC/FREDDI【EWILK\INSONTh【e extreme weath\er conditions ra】vaging this 【region\ has m\ad【e studying th【e effects o/f】 climate cha\】nge \on】 the are【a accurately nearly impossible. Th\e rese】arch completed on the expedi/tion "will fill critical data g】aps on the【 world&【rsquo;s life/ support sy】stems and drive solutions\ to /assur】e tha】t they c\a】n c/ont\】inue to fuel our future,&rd【quo; says executive director /Jonath\on Baille./A】 night wi【nd spins an anemometer\ at a 【weat/h\er stati/on installe】d during Nati【onal/\/ Geog/rap】h】ic 【a\nd Rolex's 2019 Perpetual P】l\【anet Extreme Exp\edition to Mt. Ev\erest/NATIONAL】GEOGRAPHIC/ERICDAFTNATION【AL/【GEOGRA\PHI/C【/E【RICD\AFTTo und【ertake /the stu\dy, cl//imate scientists researched bi】olo【gy, geology,【 glacio\l【ogy, map【ping,】 and\ meteorology in /the Karakora】m range. The】se fields of science, they \believe, are the most critical in understanding the e\ffects of cl【imate c/hange on t【he env】iron【ment.A total】 of five weather stations were installed on Everest/ and l/ive updates from the station are available at the Nati\onal Geo/graph【ic webs【】ite.Share this articleShareTweetSharese【ndShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShare\S/hareSendShareShareYou mig【h/t 【als/o lik\e 】 Watch/: River of clouds descends on Alpine valley【 】 \ 】 \ 【 / \ New coronavirus /not the 】\real killer: 【\it\&#】】039;s the pat\ient s 】im】\mune system\ damaging vital organs 【 】 】 】 /\ /France w/arn/s of serious side ef\】fects of c\oronavirus ‘miracle cu/res’ / 【 \ / 【 / M/o】re aboutClima/teScience/Environmental protectionWea】therHot TopicL/earn more about Clima\te Hot TopicL/earn more ab\out 【Climate 【 】 Brow/se tod\ay&【#039;s tagsvyr0

Yt7O“The lo\nge/r the sup】ply 】chain, the m/ore 【is【 wasted/”WKOi

GmJ3Text sizeA/aAaWh/en it comes/ to cr\ime re】porting, th【e med\i【a\&rsq/u\o;s /coverage is de【cid】edly 【human-fo】cus【ed. We tend to\ see re/p【orting on illega】【l drugs an【d weapons,\ but rarely 【on the expl\oit\ation of our 】natural resources, despit\e the fa/ct t\hat it \happen/s all over the globe a\n【d is a cri/mi】nal of/fe【】nce.【 The 【pro\blem is, environmenta\l crimes/ a】r】e hard to track and hard t【o prove.Arthur Par&eac\ute; is an envir\onmental crime/ rese/archer wh\o has ma】de it his life&rsquo【;s\ aim to co/me up with solut\ions【 to ensure pe】/rpet\rators /are】【 held accountable. Having/ grown up in Cost】a Rica, he spe】nt his c【hi/ldhood immerse【d in 】n\atur\e, and afte/r a fi】rst 【career in t\echnology and in【vestigating /money【 la】\undering/, /he de【cided\ to focus on what/ he knew best &ndash【/; preven/tin】g the d【estruction of o【\ur natural world.“I 】li【ved on the b【e/ach,/ g】oing surfing a【nd hiking /ev\er\y day,&/rdquo; he says. “Mov\ing to the urban streets of 【Paris \was a shock.&rdquo【\;Alongside a team o\f environment【al \lawyers at G&】】ea/cute;os/mi【ne/ in Pa【ris,【 Par&eacu\te; works to【 ex\pos\e c/rimes such as illegal w】ildlife// t【rade, res/ource extraction and pollution. H/is technical adv\【【isors c【onduct criminal analysis and investigations us\ing economic, huma\n and cyber int】el【ligence.【 The data they share can\ then be【 u】s】ed】 in ecological s【tudies or by the 【media to increa\se public \awar【en【e\/ss.The 】map gi\vin\g a\ 【vo/i】ce to the v/oi【】ce/le/ssParé’s latest feat is a tool called the Eco Crim/e Map, which【 allo【ws 】【an【o】】nymous】 users to \/repo/rt environmental crimes from wh/er】ever th/ey are in the worl】d. I/n many /countri】e\s, fear/ of politi\cal ret】aliation【 prevents victims and witnesses from 】repor【ting c【rimes to the\ author】ities. Hence, a map w/hich tracks eco crime in 【【real ti\me cou\ld 】change the way c】orru/ption is dealt with, by dr\awi\ng 【【a【ttenti【】on to c【rimin【/al trade routes. So f\ar - 178 crimes have been sha/red.&ldqu】【o;The g】oal is 】to】 ce\ntralise data related to envir】o/nmental cr】imes,【 o【btai】n information to comp】\are op\erating modes/ with other illicit indu】/stries 】and finally, to give a secure voice/ to the【 vi】ctims and witness\es of these c【rimes wit】hout ri】sk of reprisal】s,” /Par&eac】ute;】 tells Eu】ronews Living, pointing to t\】he map bel】ow..embed-container {position: re【lative; padding-bottom: 80%; height: 0; max-】【wid/th: 100%;} .embed-container iframe, .embed-c\ontainer object, .embed-c/ontainer iframe{posi/【【】tion: a【b【s/olute【; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100/%; he】ight:】 100%;} small{posit/ion: 】ab/solute; z-index: 40; bottom: /0; margin-bottom: -/15px;}Agrandir la carteRed is 】poac】h】in/\gOrange is pollu/tionGreen is illegal ext【raction\B/\lue is an/imal\ traffick/ingYello/w is】 s】anitaryPurpl【e is illegal loggin】gIf \an on】line i/nventory exists 【at t/he】 click /of a butt【on, Par&e\acute; hopes journal/ists, NGOs an】】【d authorities can make \use of the data and ex】pose the frigh/t【ening volume of crime/s committed.Fundamentally, it is a】 t\ool designed to allow any【one 【to sha【re, testify o【r rela/】y infor\mation that affects a territor/y, pop/ulation or animal and\ plant 】species】. \T/he information is 100% enc\rypted for s【a】fety reasons.Is being able to \rep【ort th【e【 crimes/ 】en\ough?Dr. Em\anuel【a Orlando, 【lecturer in Environmen】tal 】Law at the Univers】ity o\f Su\ssex, calls the map an “interesting initiative” saying it will potentially b【e able to address one of the】 main\ pro】blems wi【th e】co crime. “M【ost of these illegal co】nducts causi【ng h\arm【 to the/ environment are often 】【not detected by police and other l【aw en\forcemen\t agenci】es.” She adds, “indeed/, th/e/s】\e i\llegal ac【/tivi/ties te/nd to affect the most vulnerable sectors of the /society,\ su【ch as 】women or \/mino/rity communities in the poorest reg/ions.】”For /Dr. O/rl】ando, w\hile providing the】 voic\【eless with the protect】i】on of【 anonymity is \“welcome and shoul\【d/ be widely /publicised," she emphasises that】 reporting is 】only the first s/t/e\p of ma】n】y.\ &ld/quo;Environmental cri】me【s【 ar】e a qui】te complex issue, particu\l【arly when this is linked to org】anised crime.”S【he conclu\des/, &ldquo//;for】 these typ/es o/【f crimes, an effective strategy needs to rely on a strong enf\orcement /sy】stem” and in】stituti】ona/l framewo】rk to pr【operly ad\dress the corrup【tion.How many/ billi】\on\s is】 the environmenta/l crime industry wor【th?Acco/rd【ing to Europo/l/, the Eur\opean Union&rsquo/;s law enforcement agency, the 【/annual 【va/lue of tran\snati【onal\ environm/ental crime】 is】 esti【mate/d t\o be worth &\e\ur\o;63 to 192 billi】on euros annu】a】lly. In fa\ct, /en【vironmenta/l crime can/ be as pro】fitable【 as i】llegal dru【g trafficking, but the sanction】s】/ are m/】uch lower, an/d it i\s hard/\er to de】tect. These fa【ctors make it highl】】y a/ttractive for or/ganised crime groups.G&】eac】u【te;osmine calls it “/t/he most l/uc【rat\ive but least repr】essed illicit】 industry i\n the world.&rdq【uo; 【Group】【s are 【known to orchest\rate fake c】ons\【e\【rvation programmes, 】for examp\le, that waste m】illions of dollars in the process.“D/on’t b】uy pets online,” Par&eacut【e;/ /wa\】rns. “Often dogs and cats are being tra】ffic】\k】ed】 il\legally】 】and/ have been【 used for animal \testing.” Th/ere is/ /e/ven a \new industry emerg/in】g called cyber poac】hing. “This is a new me\thod of smuggl/ing which/ takes place on social medi\a and marketplaces like /Ebay or Amazon, \where iv/ory a【nd rhi/no ho/rns are being sold.”\The reason thes【e crimes a/re】 too o【ften ignored comes 】down /to fear of/ “blackmail a【nd pressure.”Phot\os took on a/ mission fo】r tigers parts traffic/king in Europe. The fangs here\/ were sold /K eachArth】u/r ParéIs environme\ntal crime \the s/ame as eco/cide?All over the world, laws are in p/lace to prevent envi\ronmental c\rimes from posing thre\】ats /to our everyday lives. From the dum//pi\ng of /\hazardous waste, to overfishi【ng/ a protec/ted speci/es or ivory\ \traf/ficking.By co\ntrast, ecocid【e is all/ ab【out /creating a legal dut/y of\ care for life \on ear】th【. It is the \ca\ll for the envir\onmen】t to be given rights, much li【ke humans, and/ was borne out【 of the disregard for rising 】sea levels and global war\ming】 ar【ound the world.Th\e St】op Ecocide 】campaign w【as \steered by barrister】 Polly Higgins, who died in Apri【l 】201【【9, and has /since been/ led by environmental a【ctivist 】Jojo Meht】a and others.If legally\ implemente/d, ecocide would】 mean that any hu】man activi/ty causing extens/ive d/amage t\o ecosystem【s 【or harmin【g th】e wellbeing of a species would become a crim【inal offense. This would mak】e chi【ef 】executives【 and government ministers, who commission\ /the destruction of the natural /wor\ld, criminal/ly liable】.Thus far, it has not yet been accepted as an int【erna】tiona】l crime\ by 】the United Nations.Unlike the il】l】egal \trade in drugs and other illicit goods, &ld】quo;natural resources are finite a】nd\ cannot 【b】e replenished in a l\ab,” 】stat【es Int\erpol【. 】“As such, there is a sense o\f】 urgency to comb\at en\vironmental c】rime.”The \Eco Crime Map is curr\ently crowdfunded and in search of sponsors to \sta【y afloat. Curre】ntly, it is av】ailable in English, Spanish and French/ an/d can be separated into six categ/ories】: po\aching, illegal extr【a\ctio/n,】 sa【nitary, pollut\ion, animal trafficking and illegal logging.Share this articl/e 【 More from life38j0

1.Ru0hHow technolog/y i\s infl\uen【cing th】\e future of food and housing - whilst res】pecting/ the envi\ronment3K8Y

2.gN52I/nside Bu\dapest's \green new campuslMTk

3.g0Zc】Javi\er Bar\dem t【akes over Times Square\ 【to demand ocean protections/lNlR

4.ZVv2Ne】w edible in-flight meal t/ray designed for【 plane jo】ur【neys34Sv

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PrDEThe ef\fort to end pla\stic pol/lu】tion in our oceans was /one of the【 /【key th】【emes of 2018, \wi【th Europea\n【 Un【io\n lawma【kers \ending the ye【ar with an \agr【eement to ban【 certai】n single-use 【plas】tics by 2021.Mic【r】opla/stics c】an 】affe】ct microscopic animals' ability to feed and the【】】ir ability to repro/\】duc【e Dr Matt /Cole 【/ Marine Plas【tics/ Re】search Scientist,】 Plymouth M\arin/e Laborato/r【y /Be/l】gian 】MEP Fr&eacu/te;d&eacut】e;\rique【 【Ries 【is behind the law, and t】【old Euron【ews: "Th/e balloon \sticks, the stirrers, the cotton buds, the straws, the 】plates are going to be b【anned】. And 】why \are \they going to be banned?【 Beca【u】【se t【he【y \a【re the /a\rticles that you mostly f\/ind on our beaches, /and/ on/\ our oceans, and becaus【e 【there are alternatives."A【 central issue in the single-use plastic ban is who is going to pay. The new European di/rective means fishin/g ge\ar \manufacturers will/ be】ar the cost\s of collecting ne/ts lost at】 sea, rather than the f/is/hermen.】The 】s【ame k【ind of principle is【 \being 】applied to the tobacc/o \industry and its \plast\【ic\ cigarette ends.However industry body Pla】sti\csEurop【e argues the responsibility/ should be sh】ared more widely.Executi/v\e Direc】\tor Karl Foerster explained\ th【eir posit】ion to Eur【one/w/s【: "We make the raw material, so that's our responsibili/ty, t/hen you have somebody t【hat makes /the product, then you have the c【onsum【er b/rands/ that p\】ackage any food in it, t【he people consume 【it and b\uy it \in a re/tailer, so you see t【he\re a\re many 】play【ers that are invo/lved i/n the life-cycl】e of a product\."An estimated 8 million tonnes of 【p】/last\ic waste end【s up in \th】e\】】 oce/ans every year. 】The EU's ban is【【 significant in terms o\f s】/etti\ng a policy precedent, /but it won't \change\ the seas ver【y 】much, as/ 90% of the p\la】s/tic pollution is【 believed to com/e from 10 rive【rs - 8 in As/ia, /and \two in Africa."The plastics become micro\plastics in \the oceans and ar\e eaten by marine animals. 【Dr Ma】tt Cole, a Marine Pla】stics R/es\earch Scie\nti\st at P\lym】outh\/ M\ar\ine Labo\ratory, tol【d \Euronews that all【 creatures gr【eat and small are affected. "What we've been able to identify (is) t\hat in very small plankt/onic microsco/pic animals, that the microplastics can/ effect their ability t\o feed,/ their a【bil/ity to\ re/produc【e and also their sur/vival," he 【says. "Other \researchers have d/one th\e same/ kind of work on oys】ters, mus\cles and fish, and also 】shown vario/us negati/ve impacts that th】ese plastics ca/n have on】 these animals."Along【【side】 the sin【gl/e【-use plast/ic【s// ban there are other\ e【fforts being made to sol【ve the p/roblem.This ye【ar/ The Ocea/n 】Cleanu/p deployed thei\r first system aime\d at catching large\r plastic【 w\a】ste in the Pacific for recycl/ing.Jou\rnalist name • Jeremy WilksShare this articleCopy/【paste the article \video embed link below:Cop【yShar/eT】weetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMore/H】i\deS】hareSendSh/areShareSh】areSendS】hareShar【\】eYou might also】 like 【 /】 \ 】 \ 【 I【ta【lian ban【 o/n plastic cotton 】buds 【comes into ef/fect 【 】 \ 】 】 / \ 【 【 Scotland bans si\ngl【e-us\e coffee cups in gov【ern【ment buildings【 】 / 】 \ Greenpeace: Single-use pl/astic\ h【as to stop 【 \ More aboutEco/l\ogyEnvironmental protectionPollutionEuropean politicsplastic【 Browse today's ta【gsAgWE

Wg污水处理pS

qXanOne of Greece&rsquo\;s 】【most】 popular tourist d\esti/n\atio/】ns is at risk of ecological and economical disaster as drilling【 companie\s pr\epar】e 】to exploit /thou【sands of kilometres of】 \la/nd, the World Wide Fund for N\atu\re【 (WWF) has】 w】arned.The Gre/ek government has allocated/\ 17/,000 square kilometr【es of Zakynthos to o】il/ c\【ompanies, leadi【ng to activi//sts to 【warn of t【he potential effects drilling fo【r o/il and gas could have.&l/dquo;A】bou】】t a third 【of \】the GDP of the Ionian islands comes from tourism. S】o,【 im/ag【ine t/he scenario【 【of a/ minor】】 or greater【 oil accident and what d【oes that】 mean f【or these is】l/ands】,&rdquo】; said De】】mitres】 Karavellas, t/he\ /direc/\tor-gener/al of WWF Greece.To 【hel】p 【raise awa\reness of the issue, the【 WWF France /sailing boat ‘Bl】ue Panda’ is tra/\vel】ling【/ the Ionian Sea, informing 【islanders at destinations such as Zante, Itha\/ca and K/【e\falonia about the problem.WWF is particularly concerned about the protecti/【on/ of \the loggerhe】ad turtl【e.S/hare this articleCopy/paste the article video embe】\d link below:CopyShar/eTwe【e\tSharesend/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSen\dShareS】hareShareSe/ndSh/areShareYou mi/g/ht also like/ \ / Europe \acc【used of 'turning a b【li\nd eye' to risk /of corona【virus in migrant camps / 】 Greece use【s】 state TV to\【 teach sc】hool children during coronavi】rus loc/kdown \ \ \ / 【 / Migrants arriving in Greece 】say the】y have no pr\otection again\st coronavirus \ 【 Mo【re aboutGreeceEcologica【l【【 cris/is//WWFEnviron/men【tal prote【ctionNa【tur【al\ 】gasOil 【market Brow\se to/day/'】s tagsRajG

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ZTKZFrom Amsterdam】 to Sy【dney on el【ec/t/r\icityuG8r

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XtHNGlobal energy\ demand\ debated at A】/\bu Dha/bi Sustain】abilit\y WeekV5oE

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0x风电MD

yPbQTe/x【t sizeAaAaA few hundred【 kilo】m【etres 】off the Pacific coast of Ch\ile there is \a 】paradise for div【ers and hikers.The Robin\son \C【rus【oe island i】s one of the three for【】ming the Juan Fern\ande\z archipelago.The islan\d chain secured \its place 】in history as/ the home o】f Alexande【r Selkirk, the\ Scottis】h s\ailor】】 】marooned there for fo/ur years and four mo/nths, a tale he later related t\o Daniel Defoe\,/ who penned his 】adv\enture \book ba】sed\ on his sto【ry.For almost【 a century, the in/habitants of R【obins\o\n Cruso】e ha】ve known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them co/nserving its【 unique wildlife, 【s/o they【 decided about /taking step/s a/s ear】ly as 1935.In 1977, the arc/hipel\ago was named a biospher】e reserve and almost a year a【go, Chile announced the creation of the enormous Juan Ferna】ndez Marine Park, one of the largest p【rotected zo【nes i/n th\e Pacific.It al【so co】nnects to【 a network 】of marine reserves in Chile total\/ling some 】【1.】3 【m】illion squa/re /kilometres】【, meaning that about 44 perce】nt of the nation's】 waters ha】ve some lev【el of\ protection against min【】ing and indust【】rial】 fishing."Until 10 years ago, C\hile was one o\f the bi】ggest o】cean exp\】loiters i\n the world, but now i\t ha【s 】changed course】 【and be【【come o】【ne of\ the leaders【 i【n o\cean cons/ervation, /with the creation of/ hug\e marine \parks which \wi\ll】 really help /fish/ s】tocks recover," said Alex \Munoz,【\ Latin Amer】i【ca dir\【ect】or of【 the/ NGO\ Nation】al Geographic Pristine Seas.C】lick 【o/n the 】video above to learn more\ abou】t h】ow these islands preserved 】their fragile ecosyste\m【.S\hare】 thi】s【 article More fro】】m placesmWoT

4K节能汽车E2

Gnw0Text sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000T/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ life twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ifeCYOd

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